Posts Tagged ‘Jacket Jazz books’

Sleepless in Sienna Plantation

July 16, 2016

 

 

It’s early Saturday morning and I cannot sleep. It’s still dark outside in Sienna Plantation. Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday this week we were out the door by 7 AM on our way to MD Anderson for blood work, review, and transfusion or appointment with my oncologist. On Thursday, I was on my way to La Grange, Texas for a Quilts, Inc. Executive Committee meeting. Today was my day to sleep in. I love to sleep late, but not today. There’s too much on my mind.

Was it the excitement of yesterday’s blood work revealing  my  platelets count went up since Wednesday’s results? Or was it the fear of needing a stem cell transplant if my numbers don’t elevate to at least 20,000 over the next few weeks?

Yesterday’s results were reason to cheer and hug with my two favorite Physician’s Assistants. However, just last week we were nervous and worried about dipping to 3,000 platelets until it got to 1,000. Starting back up, instead of dropping lower, was reason to cheer. I was on a high when we got home even after a stop at the Quilts, Inc. office for a few hours of work.

Over the last few months I haven’t felt like concentrating on anything in my studio other than an order from the Texas Quilt Museum for collage cards and design packets. When I got home yesterday late afternoon, I went into my studio and decided it was time I spend some time creating or catching-up on adding merchandise to my etsy shop. Or maybe I start with straightening my design wall clutter and work table mess.

Design wall

Design Wall in my Studio

My whole studio is a far cry from the order it was in for the photo shoot of my work space for the publication, Where Women Create. My studio is featured in the Nov/Dec/Jan2015 issue. What a fun day with my kind friend, Jo Packham, the editor of the magazine.

So last night I had the energy and desire to add to my etsy shop two little frocks I made early this year. When our children were here for Easter, our granddaughter, Madison Murrah modeled the frocks while another, Lindsey Huebner photographed them. The garments have been hanging in my studio since then. It was good to get those posted last night. The pattern I used is Simplicity 1080. The frock on the left is made from a vintage cutwork tablecloth. The frock on the right features a 1930’s embroidered hostess apron I imagine was worn by the hostess for a bridge party. Both pieces are in excellent condition.

I have collected vintage linens, laces, patchwork, and trims since I started having an interest in sewing and embellishing when I was in my twenties. I have boxes and closets full of everything you would ever need for a lifetime of stitching and creating. Madison would take all those things in a heartbeat, if she weren’t just 19 and going to college.

Where did all this begin? How did a young woman with a degree in Elementary Education, who just wanted to be a stay-at-home mom and wife to an executive husband have a life-time career as a teacher, author and show planner?

It all started when our youngest son, who is now 41, was an infant in arms. His brother was 6 and his sister 2 1/2. I was sewing fabric squares together to make quilts when I had a few minutes to myself. There were no books to follow, but occasionally an article in Women’s Day or Woman’s Circle on quilting.

One lucky day I learned of an antique shop teaching quilting classes at night. What joy I found that one night out each week that I could be with other quilters and learn how to make a quilt. In a little over a year, my first full-sized quilt was hanging at Great Expectations Quilt Show, and my quilt was featured on the advertising postcard. There was no turning back.

Quilting and creating became my passion. I started teaching classes in a Continuing Education program at our church while Todd was in second grade, Holly was in pre-school, and Troy was in the Mother’s Day Out program at our church. I was actually using my degree. As a thirty-three year old young woman, I loved teaching women many years older than I how to create something beautiful. They were of a generation where women did not work outside the home. For many it was the first time they were so proud of their accomplishments. It became a mission for me.

Quickly the word was out and I started teaching at a couple of small shops. I sewed well into many nights once I had the children to bed. I couldn’t get enough of it. Oh, to have just a little of that energy today.

sewing

My Sewing Corner in the 1970’s

It wasn’t long after that that I had a meeting with the owner of Great Expectations, Karey Bresenhan. She had added fabrics to her antique shop and wanted me to make some samples for her. That led to teaching classes for her on how to make tote bags, bibs on pinafores, notebook covers, etc. from the quilt blocks I had learned while taking classes from her mother, Jewel Patterson. I sometimes wonder what my life would have been like if I hadn’t taken that first meeting with Karey. I have worked for her for 40 years now.

My career took off. Wait a minute…I didn’t plan to have a career. Remember I am raising three little children. I’m a mom. Somehow I was propelled and soon teaching at Quilt Fair ’78, designing a garment for the first Fairfield/Concord Fashion Show which later became the Bernina Fashion Show,

IMG_2970

Patchwork and Lace Jacket for the Fairfield/Concord Fashion Show

designing and creating large fabric pieces for a debutante ball, being published in magazines, becoming VP of the Greater Houston Quilt Guild, part of a two-woman fashion show,

Holly

Holly Modeling for Fashion Show

creating special decorative items for antique shops from vintage quilts and linens, designing and making rodeo vests for a trendy dress shop, etc.

Then in 1982, my husband moved us to Victoria, Texas, so he could run an independent bank there. Did my career or my association with Karey Bresenhan end there? Guess again. She did not want to see me go, but that didn’t mean she let go. Shortly after we moved, I came back to Houston to a wonderful surprise going-away party Karey had in her shop. I was presented with a quilt full of hearts and signatures from my students at Great Expectations Quilts. I continued to go back to Karey’s shop to teach a full load of classes.

What’s next? It wasn’t long after I arrived in Victoria, Texas that I started teaching quilting and related decorative classes at the Open Door Creativity Center.

IMG_2976

Open Door Creativity Center

Quilting caught on quickly. The classes were popular and it wasn’t long after that that Susan Manning and I formed the Quilt Guild of Greater Victoria under the umbrella of the Nave Museum. I was their first President and remained active in the Guild for 20 years. I also became very active in the Victoria community. Soon one of the Guild members opened a quilt shop where we gathered for classes. I taught there and in a shop in Edna, Texas on a regular basis for many years.

During that time teaching picked up in other towns, more of my designs were published in books and magazines including Virginia Avery’s book Quilts to Wear. In 1983, I took charge of the Education program for Quilt Festival and Quilt Market and became first President of South/Southwest Quilt Association which is IQA today.IMG_2977

Later in the 80’s we started taking Quilt Market to other cities in the summer. Not long after that, we took Quilt Market to European countries along with Quilt Expo. That made for lots of over seas travel for 20 years, but what a delight to see all those European countries and to meet so many wonderful people. Life was busy and children were growing older.

In the early 90’s I was approached by the Editor in Chief, Barbara Weiland, of That Patchwork Place to write a book on the garments I was creating. I had started a series on collage patchwork jackets about that time. After much hesitation, I did write the first book, Jacket Jazz. A series of 6 more books and a pattern line followed over the next 10 years. The first two books put me on the teaching circuit map. I began teaching all over the country for many years. That was gratifying, but hard, exhausting work. I also designed a line of fabric with a Jacket Jazz flair during this time.

Judy Murrah published books

“Jacket Jazz” series

Kids continued to grow, went off to college, graduated, married, had babies. I quit teaching in 2006. We moved back to Houston in 2007. Since then my life has been filled with being with my husband, VP of Education and Administration for Quilts, Inc., mother and Grammy, and active in our church.

Now my focus is on getting well so I can enjoy these golden years, play in my studio, be with our family and travel with my husband. I want to be able to manage MDS. I know the only cure is a stem cell transplant, if it’s successful. Please keep praying for more platelets. Your prayers sustain me, and I am so thankful for you, my friends. God bless you all. Judy

golf

Our Family

 

Advertisements

Saturday’s Simple Recipe Page 22 Taco Soup

February 13, 2016

Hello Everyone,

Sorry it has been a couple of weeks since you heard from me. When I’ve been home, I have spent time in my studio every spare minute. I had a big order from the Texas Quilt Museum that I finally finished yesterday.

I made 20 collage greeting cards,

birthday

Happy Birthday, Jennifer

thanks

Thanks

thirteen Design Packets,

design

Thirteen Design Packets

and twelve mug rugs or hot pads.

pads

Twelve Mug Rugs or Hot Pads

I loved every minute of the hours in my studio. There are only a few other places I would rather be.

Now let’s think about cooking. We are getting near the end of my family cookbook. Here is the fourth from the end.

Taco Soup

In the middle 90’s, I went to Seattle to teach several of “That Patchwork Place” employees how to make the second five Jazz jackets. The jackets were pictured in my second book Jacket Jazz Encore. Marta Estes made this soup for our lunch one day. My husband loves this and will eat it for several days. Thank you, husband. I don’t feel guilty when I’d rather be creating in my studio than cooking in the kitchen. The soup is very easy.

soup

Taco Soup

Ingredients

1 ½ lbs. hamburger

16 oz. can diced tomatoes

15 oz. can kidney beans and juice

1 pkg. taco seasoning mix

15 oz. can chicken broth

1 can corn

1 chopped onion

1 small can rotel tomatoes (mild)

1 can hominy

Toppings

Tortilla chips

Grated cheddar cheese

Chopped avocado

Sour cream

Sliced black olives

Fresh cilantro

Instructions

In large kettle sauté meat and onion, breaking up with a spatula as it cooks.

Add taco seasoning and stir. Add tomatoes, beans, corn, hominy and broth. Stir and simmer for at least ½ hour or up to a few hours.

Serve by mounding broken tortilla chips in the bottom of the bowl; add a dollop of sour cream, then the soup. Top with grated cheese, sliced olives, and chopped avocado and cilantro.

Ummm…I think I’ll make a pot this week. Those of you who are looking out your window at snow would love this hot, tasty soup.

Happy cooking and creating to you until we meet again, Judy

Saturday’s Simple Recipe Page 19 Easy Cheesy Potatoes

January 2, 2016

Since Thanksgiving is so close to Christmas, each year I choose to have a Honey Baked Ham for Thanksgiving and Turkey for Christmas. These potatoes are easy and go well with baked ham and Green Bean Bundles.

The recipe came from members of my Stitch and Bitch group in Victoria, Texas. I was one of the original members of this stitching group and active for about 25 years.

judy

Michelle, Judy, Judy, Judy, & Betty Jo

The membership changed many times over the years, but it was always nice to get together once a month for stitching, talking and lunching.

nell

Una Mae, Judy, Michelle, Nell

We tried to keep 12 members in the group so each member took a turn once a year to host our group.

tanya

Tanya, Jimmie, Carol, Michelle, Judy

I moved back to Houston from Victoria nine years ago, but the group continues on today. I miss those relationships.

andra

Judy, Andra, Michelle, and Betty Jo many years ago.

Easy Cheesy Potatoes

potato

Potato Ingredients

Ingredients

32 oz. frozen hash brown potatoes

8 oz. carton of sour cream

1 can cream of mushroom soup

12 oz. grated Cheddar cheese

½ tsp. salt

¼ tsp. pepper

1 small onion chopped into small pieces

2 cups crushed corn flakes            Put these in a zip-lock bag and mash with your hand.

½ cup melted butter

Instructions

Place hash brown potatoes in 9″ X 13″ Pyrex dish sprayed with Pam. Stir in chopped onions. Mix together sour cream, soup, cheese, salt, and pepper. Spread mixture over potatoes and onions. Top with the crushed corn flakes. Drizzle the melted butter over the corn flakes. Bake at 350 degrees for 1 hour. Everyone will go back for seconds. What is left over is good the next day heated in the microwave.thanksgiving

Did you make any New Year’s resolutions? I used to make resolutions every year, and they were always the same. Now I think of a word for the year. This year my word  is “courage.” I need courage for serious things and those that aren’t so serious.

On the less serious side this year, I want the courage to try to create wearables again, but different from the Jacket Jazz flavor.  I plan to make little dresses and tops using the vintage lace, embellishments, and garment pieces I’ve collected over the years.

Yesterday I started designing a little dress using a pattern from Simplicity called Dottie Angel. I noticed this cute pattern when visiting Michele Muska in her booth at Fall Quilt Market. She said she’d send the pattern to me. The pattern was waiting for me when I went to the office after Christmas. The timing was perfect.

DRESS

The Start of a Little Dress Using a Vintage Apron

I worked on the dress most of today. It’s almost finished. I’ll send you a picture later in the week with it complete. Would love to have your input.

In closing:

The following was a wish on a birthday card I received in 2013. I saved it because I thought the sentiment was a good message for a new year, too. Here it is for you.

May you have a moment to reflect on the past year and all you’ve accomplished and to look forward to all that may be waiting for you in the year ahead…

But mostly, in that moment, may you realize here and now what a gift your life is–not just to you but to everyone who knows you.

You are a gift to me. Thank you for being part of my life. Happy New Year! Judy

 

Saturday’s Simple Recipe Page 6 French Toast

August 29, 2015

It’s Saturday evening and I haven’t sent your recipe for this week. But it’s still coming. My goal today was to finish one of the three garments I need to make for the Houston Quilt shows.

We have many fabulous fabric manufacturers who are exhibitors at Quilt Market. Two or three of them donate fabrics each year for the members of the Education team to make garments to wear on the same days. This all began when my first book, Jacket Jazz, was published. For many years, I wore garments from my books, and many of our staff did the same. When I finished writing this series of books and teaching, I quit making garments until last year. It has been fun to create these show garments again. The one I finished today is made from a jelly roll of fabric strips by Robert Kaufman. Jennifer Sampou is the designer. A pattern company,  Indygo Junction by Amy Barickman, donated our patterns of choice from her line. I chose the Gathered Back Top & Tunic pattern for this fabric. I’ll wear it with black tights.

Strip Pieced Tunic

Strip Pieced Tunic

Now that my first show garment is complete, it’s time to give you the recipe for this week. A book of family requested recipes could not be complete without my French Toast. I learned how to make it while watching my mother as I grew-up. There are much fancier ways to create French Toast, but most everyone in our family loves Grammy’s the best.

Holly and Julie getting a Lesson

Holly and Julie Getting a Lesson at Christmas

Once, Troy ate 8 pieces at one time when he was home from college. I think that’s the record. Madison has loved Grammy’s French Toast passionately since the first time I made it for her. Now Lindsey is just as great a fan. Ashton, Tyler, and Sydney get caught-up in the excitement, but they aren’t fans like Madison and Lindsey. They all enjoyed French Toast during our “children only” Christmas Tea last December

Christmas Tea

Christmas Tea

Grammy’s French Toast

Ingredients

White bread from the grocery store

2 eggs

1/3-1/2 cup milk

Dash of salt

1 teaspoon Vanilla (The secret ingredient)

Butter

White sugar

This will make 5-6 pieces. Just double it for more.

Instructions

I make mine in an electric skillet. I can use other skillets, if necessary, but really prefer my electric skillet.

Beat together eggs and milk in pie pan. Stir in salt and vanilla.

Melt butter in heated skillet. Quickly coat bread in batter on both sides. Place in skillet. When slightly brown on one side, turn and brown on other side. Add more butter if bread sticks to skillet. Remove to plate when brown on both sides. Butter one side and sprinkle with white sugar. Eat while hot.

waiting

Waiting for French Toast

If you have a leisurely Sunday morning, you might want to try my recipe. Try topping it with plain white sugar before you pull out the powdered sugar or maple syrup. That’s the way we like it. Have a great day. Hugs and sugar, Judy

 

.

Saturday’s Simple Recipe Page 4 Chocolate Meringue Pie

August 16, 2015

Oh, dear. I didn’t send you a recipe yesterday. Sorry I’m a day late. My sister came from San Antonio for a weekend visit to sew pumpkins for her shop, Apples of Gold, at Artisan’s Alley. I’m sorry to say that as we sewed all day Saturday, I never thought about my blog.

Pumpkins for Sale

Pumpkins for Sale

Then today we went to Sunday school, church and lunch before we packed-up her pumpkins and sent her on her way home.

Suzanne and Me

My sister, Suzanne, and Me

Then, I came upstairs to catch-up on email and remembered I forgot to send you Page 4 of my Recipe Book yesterday. It’s one of my favorites from my mom.

Shortly after I wrote my first book, Jacket Jazz,  in 1993, I taught frequently in San Antonio. I’d stay with Mom, and she always fixed my favorite meal for dinner with chocolate meringue pie for dessert. We ALWAYS had dessert after every meal in my home when I was growing up. I looked forward to dinner at Mom’s house all day while I was teaching. Now her pie is one of the most requested desserts from my family.

Chocolate Meringue Pie

Ingredients

2 cups whole milk

1 cup sugar

2 rounding tablespoons flour

1 large heaping tablespoon Hershey’s cocoa

Dash of salt

3 egg yolks (Whites will be used for the meringue.)

Instructions

Heat 2 cups milk in sauce pan until warm. Add sugar, flour, cocoa, and salt. Stir until dissolved. Add egg yolks one at a time, and beat quickly with a wire whisk. Cook until thick stirring vigorously all the time to make sure it doesn’t burn on the bottom. Stir in vanilla just before finished. Pour into a baked pie shell.  Top with meringue.

Mom’s Meringue recipe will be on Page 15. Her Pie Crust will be on Page 18. We’ll keep going until you have 26 pages of my favorite and most used recipes.

My mom

My Mom when I was growing-up.

I really have thought about you during the week. I love hearing from you and your well wishes as I go through monthly chemo treatments for MDS. At my visit last week with my oncologist, Dr. Garcia-Manero, I was given a good report. He says my recent bone marrow aspiration shows that the chemo is working. The question most people ask is how long will I have to take chemo. Dr. Garcia-Manero’s answer is “As long as it works.” So that’s it folks.

Hope you have a great week. I’ll talk to you again next week. Much love and hugs, Judy

 

Play Date #5 Drawstring Bag

May 2, 2012

It’s time to play again. So get your creative energy flowing and see what you can make from those “false start and reject” patchwork pieces.

5 bags

Five Patchwork Drawstring Bags

I have been sewing since I was six years old and have been collecting things since then, too. As the years went by my collecting became a challenge to find the best deal, the next new craft idea toys and tools, the antique quilt no one wanted…you get the idea. Among that collecting is a very large plastic tub containing every piece of patchwork I have ever created that did not get used in a project. Oh, and some of that patchwork someone else created and gave to me or I bought at a Quilt Guild Show. It seems other people are able to cast out their unused patchwork, but not I.

Use It Up

Use It Up

So let’s make something with that patchwork. What do you have? Get it all out. Sort through and find some things that look like they might work together in a color scheme. Here’s what I grouped together from technique samples when I taught wearables from my “Jacket Jazz” series. The color scheme components are purples and oranges.

Purple and orange

Purple and Orange Components

Let’s Get Started

1. Start with your biggest patchwork piece. This Continuous Bias patchwork piece measures 13″ X 15″. Do I want it larger? How about that piece of Machine Grid Smocking? It fits, so I stitch it right sides together with a 1/4″ seam allowance and press it away from the main patchwork piece. I trim all the edges straight and it now measures 15″ X 17″. That’s a good size.

Side One

Side One Complete

2. Let’s see if I can create that same size with the remaining bits and pieces of patchwork and manipulations. It’s time to pull-in the lining fabric. After a few auditions I like this Kaffe Fassett sunflower cotton print. What do you think? The lining is also the binding and casing at the top of the bag.

lining

Add the Lining Fabric

3. Let’s add strips on the side to make the Seminole Patchwork 15″ wide. Another strip of fabric above that will be the piece on which the lining will turn-on to the front. I don’t want the lining to cover the Seminole Patchwork. Again I stitch right sides together and press seam away from patchwork. The piece is now 6″ tall with another 11″ to go.

first row

First Row Complete

4. Let’s introduce the lining fabric before adding another row of patchwork pieces. I cut it one and a half inches wide and stitch and flip that strip. Now there are 10″ to go for Side Two.

5. What’s next? What’s left? Let’s square-up some of those odd pieces. Now I sew 3 of them together and get a 15″ wide strip. Just what I need. I sew right sides together with larger piece, press seam to one side, trim even and contemplate again.

Second Row Complete

Second Row Complete

6. Let’s add another rest stop with a 1″ wide lining strip before adding more patchwork. Now let’s see if we can make a wider strip with the rest of the fabric manipulations. Yes, with a little piecing and adding on to those strangely cut pieces I think we have a 15″ wide piece. So it’s stitch and flip and press again. I use a steam iron and do not miss this step as it’s very important for keeping your piece flat and even.

7. One more strip of lining fabric will complete the second side of the bag to match the size of the first side.

Side 2

Side Two Complete

Oh, dear there are a few pieces left from the purple and orange patchwork. They will go in my collage card making box. Waste not, want not.

leftovers

Leftover “Leftovers”

Time out…I need to make a collage greeting cardwith the left-over “left-overs.”

collage greeting card

Thank You Collage Greeting Card

Now it’s on to the lining and pockets.

1. Place the patchwork pieces right sides together. Trim if they aren’t the same size. Use a gridded mat to make sure all four sides are even. Place on top of lining fabric which is right sides together. Cut lining 2″ taller than the patchwork.

2. Make pockets from left-over lining fabric. They can be any size you like. Very often the amount of fabric I have left from the lining dictates the size of the pockets I make. Cut two pieces for each pocket you make. Sew pocket pieces right sides together using a 1/4″ seam allowance. Leave an opening for turning. Clip corners. Turn right side out. Press and turn the raw edge in. Center and pin pocket to right side of one of the lining pieces 4″ from top edge. Leaving top open stitch on 2 sides and bottom close to edge. Add a second pocket to the other side of the lining. If you prefer, stitch a seam in the middle of the pocket to make two smaller pockets.

3. Place lining right sides together with all edges even. Put patchwork right sides together and layered on top of the lining 2″ from top of lining. Other three edges should be even. Pin all 4 layers together. Stitch two sides and bottom together with a 3/8″ seam allowance. Leave 3/4″ free of stitching above patchwork on the lining.

leave open

Leave Seam Open

4. Turn right sides out bringing the patchwork fronts to the outside. Lining will be inside bag with 2″ extending above patchwork bag. Fold lining/casing in half onto itself.

fold casing

Fold Casing in Half

5. Fold casing down onto bag. Pin to bag. Top stitch casing through all layers. The 3/4″ on the lining that was left unstitched is where the ribbon will be inserted to make the drawstrings.

6. Choose ribbon or cording twice the width of the bag plus 4″. You need this length two times.

ribbons

Ribbons for Casing

7. Using the opening on one side of casing run ribbon through with a bodkin or safety-pin. Leave tail outside of casing on one end. Run ribbon all the way back to where you started. Pull out small amount. Hold two ends together and tie ends in a knot. Pull tightly so knot doesn’t come out.

knot

Knot in Ribbon

8. Do the same with the second ribbon starting on the opposite casing side. Put one knotted ribbon in each hand and pull. The bag closes tightly.

drawstrings

Drawstrings Pulled Tight

The drawstring bag is complete with lining and pockets and ready to fill.

lining

Lining and Pockets

Now that was simple. Want to see a few more ideas? Here are a few others I have made. Go to my etsy shop to see details for each of them.

wedge

Wonder Wedge Drawstring Bag

rayon bag

Rayon Strip Pieced Drawstring Bag

blue bag

Stripped Piece Drawstring Bag

Chinese bag

China Red and Green Bag

I hope you will make a Drawstring Bag from your left-over patchwork pieces. We all would love to see your creation. If you have any questions on the directions I have given you here, don’t hesitate to ask. I’d love to help.

So here’s another challenge. This time there is no prize or deadline. It’s just a simple challenge for you to use some of your left-over patchwork to make a drawstring bag. Then send a picture to me so I can post it on this blog.

Friday I will announce the winner of the little sewing drawer full of vintage lace. Stay tuned and keep stitching. Judy

Hello World!

December 29, 2011
Judy Murrah published books

"Jacket Jazz" series

Hello. I’m Judy Murrah. Since I was a child, I’ve created with needle, thread, fabric, glue, paper and paint. After earning a BS degree in Education with a minor in Art, I first taught elementary school and then Art in middle school. It wasn’t long after I married that we started a family, so teaching gave way to being a full-time mother. But, shortly after our third child was born, I started to teach quilting in the Adult Education program at our church. This local teaching led to a 30-year career teaching quilting and related arts nationally and internationally. My successful “Jacket Jazz” book series was published via five different “wearables” books plus two other “how-to” quilt-related books.

My career as an International Quilt Show planner paralleled my teaching, writing and designing. Then, six years ago, duties as Vice President of Education and Administration for Quilts, Inc. took precedence over my teaching. I miss the contact with my students, but being on the team that creates three Quilt Festivals and two Quilt Markets each year takes much time and effort.

 My friend and Art Coach, Lesley Riley, prompted me start a blog. With some trepidation and encouragement and help from my new friend, Tom Russell, here I am taking the plunge to reach out to you. My goal is to build a creative community of students and contemporaries. 
One of my favorite sayings is “Everything old is new again.” I’m ready now to create new art, and I hope you will come along with me as I try new ideas plus teach old ones that may be new to you. We can see what’s in my studio and I will provide free projects to create while learning together and inspiring each other.  I’m hoping to connect with you while giving myself a chance to play while creating my platform and voice once again.  Come along.  Let’s see what we can do.

%d bloggers like this: